Kalimantan

 

 

Down to Earth No. 43, November 1999

In South Kalimantan province, coal mining - involving Australian companies - is continuing to disrupt the lives of local communities. In Hulu Sungai Utara district, the district head, Suhailin Muchtar said that both legal and illegal coal mining activities had damaged the environment. PT Adaro Indonesia's coal mine (part-owned by Australia's New Hope) operates in this district.

Down to Earth No 43, November 1999

After many years of peaceful process and unsuccessful negotiations, Dayaks communities in Central Kalimantan have moved back on to their traditional mining sites. This direct action was taken as a last resort to defend rights consistently denied by the Indonesian government and by the mining company which took over their lands.

Down to Earth No. 43, November 1999

Rio Tinto, the UK-based mining giant is exploring the possibility of opening a nickel mine in Kendari district, Southeast Sulawesi. Joordan Hutagalung, an executive of PT Rio Tinto Exploration Indonesia said in July that the company had been issued a licence for survey preparations. Satellite imagery showed that the area contained nickel, copper and gold.

Down to Earth No. 42, August 1999

A long-running land dispute between oil palm plantation company PT London Sumatra and indigenous Dayak landowners has resulted in large-scale military and police repression in East Kalimantan.

Down to Earth No. 41, May 1999

Farmers, workers, indigenous peoples, fisherfolk, NGOs, students and academics are coming together to formulate people-centred, environmentally sound development strategies to replace the obsolete, bankrupt and abusive money-centred practices of the Suharto era.

Down to Earth No 40, February 1999

A number of factors are forcing the pace of reforms in forestry policy in Indonesia: many logging concessions have expired or will do so soon; the devastating 1997/8 forest fires; the corruption revealed in the aftermath of Suharto's resignation; the pressure for increased revenues from the forestry and plantation sectors from the economic crisis; loan conditions imposed by international donors; the ITTO's goal of sustainable logging by 20

Down to Earth No. 39, November 1998

New mining investment has been in the doldrums since last year's Busang fraud and the slump in world metals prices. Japanese investors are pulling in their horns; many Indonesian companies face bankruptcy. In its desperation to attract and keep foreign investment in Indonesia, Habibie's government is giving international mining giants like Newmont and Rio Tinto an easy ride.