Kalimantan

 

 

Down to Earth No. 58, August 2003

PT IMK will not have to pay compensation for throwing people out of their mining areas.

 
by Erma S. Ranik


"Since the beginning of IMK's operations, fish have become scarce because IMK has polluted the river and our livestock can no longer graze because IMK has destroyed the area.

Down to Earth No. 58, August 2003


The long record of human rights abuses associated with Indonesia's first pulp and rayon mill in North Sumatra has so far failed to convince the government to shut it down. The protests continue.

Fifty two village heads from three subdistricts in North Sumatra travelled to Jakarta in June to urge the government to shut down the notorious Toba Pulp Lestari (TPL) mill, formerly known as Indorayon.

Down to Earth No 58  August 2003


Two dead in Lonsum plantation dispute

On July 21, one 30-year old man was killed and another was reported to be in a critical condition after police shot at villagers in Bulukumba, South Sulawesi. Four of the injured were suffering from gun-shot wounds, according to media reports. Another man died on July 25th, during surgery to remove a bullet from his leg.

Down to Earth No 57  May 2003


The world's largest mining company, Rio Tinto, has faced severe criticism on human rights, the environment, health & safety and pay & conditions. The company's dismal record in Indonesia has been spotlighted in a new report by WALHI, published to coincide with the company's annual general meetings.

Rio Tinto's annual general meetings in London and Perth sparked co-ordinated protest actions in Indonesia, Australia and Britain.

Down to Earth No 56  February 2003

The severely damaging impacts of mining on women have been highlighted in a new report, launched by Oxfam Community Aid Abroad on November 25th, International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women.

Oxfam Community Aid's report, Tunnel Vision: Women, Mining and Communities, is a compilation of papers presented at a forum convened in Melbourne in June last year to explore the impacts of mining on women in local communities.

Down to Earth No 56  February 2003


The efforts of UK-based mining company Rio Tinto to convince the world of its commitment to human rights have suffered another blow. According to media reports, in December, the family of human rights defender and poet Wiji Thukul rejected a human rights award funded by the company. For the past two years, Rio Tinto has contributed funds to the Yap Thiam Hien Human Rights Award, won this year by Wiji Thukul, who has been missing since 1996.

Down to Earth No 56  February 2003


Dutch and Indonesian campaigners succeeded in persuading Akzo Nobel to cancel its plans to invest in a new pulp plant in South Kalimantan in January, three months after Indonesia's forestry minister withdrew the feeder plantation's licence. But a state-owned Chinese company has stepped in with a deal to fund 80% of the costs.

Akzo Nobel signed an agreement with Singaporean construction company Poh Lian in 2001 to build the plant which makes the bleaching agents for pulp processing.