Newsletter articles

DTE's quarterly newsletter provides information on ecological justice in Indonesia.

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DTE publications

Down to Earth 87, December 2010
 

DTE is starting a series of brief updates on our activities to let people know more about our campaigns, capacity-building and information work. Feedback is welcome: contact dte@gn.apc.org

Special issue with contributions from JATAM, London Mining Network and Nostromo Research

Indonesia's Coal: local impacts - global links
 

Download the complete pdf newsletter or click on separate articles...

Down to Earth No.85-86, August 2010

JATAM's new Deadly Coal report highlights the devastating impacts of coal mining in Kalimantan, where today's coal rush is undermining sustainable livelihoods and health and exacerbating poverty in order to supply export markets. The following is extracted from the full report.

Down to Earth No.85-86, August 2010

The following is extracted from a special report by Roger Moody of Nostromo Research, for Mines and Communities. The full report is at www.minesandcommunities.org/article.php?a=10299.

Down to Earth No.85-86, August 2010

DTE asked climate justice activist Mark Lloyd about coal and coal activism in Scotland...and his thoughts on reading JATAM's Deadly Coal report.

Down to Earth No.85-86, August 2010

By Geoff Nettleton, Kailash Kutwaroo, edited by Richard Solly with input from Roger Moody and Mark Muller.

The rise in average atmospheric temperature and increased frequency of extreme weather events are widely understood to be a major threat to the future of all current human societies and ecological zones.1

Down to Earth No.85-86, August 2010

The case of Rio Tinto, BP, the Bakrie Brothers and Kaltim Prima Coal.

By Andrew Hickman, DTE

It is a sad fact that more than 10 years after the fall of Suharto and the establishment of democratic rule in Indonesia corruption, collusions and nepotism, known in Indonesian as KKN - remain key problems and challenges faced by Indonesia today.