Newsletter articles

DTE's quarterly newsletter provides information on ecological justice in Indonesia.

To get on the mailing list for e-updates with links to the latest articles or PDF file of the full newsletter, click in the green box on the homepage.

The Bahasa Indonesia list offers links to selected articles from each newsletter issue.

To get on our  mailing list for hard copies (£10 a year, English newsletter only) send a request to dte@gn.apc.org.

DTE publications

Down to Earth No.85-86, August 2010

The case of Rio Tinto, BP, the Bakrie Brothers and Kaltim Prima Coal.

By Andrew Hickman, DTE

It is a sad fact that more than 10 years after the fall of Suharto and the establishment of democratic rule in Indonesia corruption, collusions and nepotism, known in Indonesian as KKN - remain key problems and challenges faced by Indonesia today.

Down to Earth No.85-86, August 2010 

Voices from an East Kalimantan village tell what it's like to live in a major coal-mining area. By Siti Maimunah (Working Team on Women and Mining, JATAM) and Merah Johansyah (JATAM East Kalimantan).


Makroman, a village in Samarinda municipality - the capital of East Kalimantan province - is encircled by mines. For the past five years coal mining operations have been excavating the land around Makroman.

Down to Earth No.85-86, August 2010

The following is extracted from a special report by Roger Moody of Nostromo Research, for Mines and Communities. The full report is at www.minesandcommunities.org/article.php?a=10299.

The world's second most-populated country was, until recently, believed to contain the world's fourth largest reserves of coal.

Down to Earth No.85-86, August 2010

Indonesia is now the world's largest exporter of thermal coal - supplying power stations and generating electricity in India, China Europe and many other countries around the world.

Download the complete pdf newsletter or click on separate articles...

 

 

DTE 84, March 2010

By Pang Yuriun, Coordinator of Aceh's Indigenous Peoples' Network (JKMA).

Accepting REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation) schemes as a necessary means to combat global warming bears a series of consequences for all of us. First, measures undertaken under the REDD mechanism need to be an integral part of an overall strategy to combat illegal logging and reduce the rate of forest destruction and degradation.

Down to Earth No.84, March 2010

In February of this year, at the invitation of JATAM (the Indonesian Mining Advocacy Network) and JATAM Kaltim (JATAM East Kalimantan), DTE staff member Andrew Hickman went to see for himself the effects of coal mining in and around Samarinda, East Kalimantan.