Newsletter articles

DTE's quarterly newsletter provides information on ecological justice in Indonesia.

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The Bahasa Indonesia list offers links to selected articles from each newsletter issue.

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DTE publications

Down to Earth Special Issue, October 1999

At the Congress, delegates drew up work plans for AMAN based on priorities identified in earlier discussions. Their draft programme was presented in a plenary session and the following plan of action agreed. As five sub-groups had worked independently there is some overlap between sections.

Down to Earth Special Issue, October 1999

The indigeous coastal communities of Aceh have a well-developed traditional system to manage and protect their coastal and marine resources. Strong traditional institutions control access to fishing rights. The head bears the title of Phang Laot or 'Admiral'.

Down to Earth Special Issue, October 1999

The Alliance of Indigenous Peoples of the Archipelago (AMAN) was created on March 21st, 1999 as a result of the Indigenous People's Congress. The formation of AMAN is a significant step forward in indigenous peoples' struggle for the recognition of their rights in Indonesia.

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Down to Earth No. 42, August 1999

East Timor's forests and agricultural lands have suffered extensive damage during the Indonesian occupation. Restoring the environment and setting the country on a development path that is economically viable, socially just and environmentally sustainable will be one of the many formidable challenges facing the government of an independent East Timor.

Down to Earth No. 42, August 1999

A new DTE report prepared for Down to Earth by Roger Moody, Nostromo Research, May 1999

Down to Earth No. 42, August 1999

A new approach to lending is needed among Indonesia's creditors which addresses the problems of poverty, the abuse of human rights and the degradation of natural resources.