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DTE's quarterly newsletter provides information on ecological justice in Indonesia.

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DTE publications

Down to Earth No 58  August 2003


An interview with Erma Suryani Ranik, volunteer for AMA Kalbar (Indigenous Peoples Alliance, West Kalimantan), who has been visiting the UK and Norway as part of DTE's programme with the indigenous peoples alliance, AMAN.

 

What are the main problems facing indigenous peoples in West Kalimantan?

The main problem is that our land rights are not being recognised.

Down to Earth No 57 May 2003

  • The minister of forestry, Mohammad Prakosa, has revoked the licenses of two plywood manufacturers - PT Wana Rimba Kencana in East Kalimantan and PT Benua Indah in West Kalimantan - following inspection by the Revitalisation of Forestry Sector Industries Task Force - a new ministry watchdog. The forestry minister also refused to extend the logging licences of 13 companies, but would not release their names.

Down to Earth No 56  February 2003


Dutch and Indonesian campaigners succeeded in persuading Akzo Nobel to cancel its plans to invest in a new pulp plant in South Kalimantan in January, three months after Indonesia's forestry minister withdrew the feeder plantation's licence. But a state-owned Chinese company has stepped in with a deal to fund 80% of the costs.

Akzo Nobel signed an agreement with Singaporean construction company Poh Lian in 2001 to build the plant which makes the bleaching agents for pulp processing.

Down to Earth No 55  November 2002


Human rights abuses connected to the logging industry will increase in West Papua as more forests are destroyed and the Indonesian security forces continue their business activities in a climate of impunity.

In July 2002, West Papuan human rights group ELSHAM reported a series of logging-related human rights abuses committed between February and June 2002 by members of the Indonesian armed forces stationed in sub-districts around Jayapura.

Down to Earth No 55  November 2002


Tensions between the plantation company HSL and the indigenous community in the Manis Mata area of West Kalimantan have increased. In July, the British-owned company started to clear villagers' customary land at Terusan even though the community has repeatedly stated its outright opposition to oil palm.

Down to Earth No 52, February 2002

Three of the biggest banks in the Netherlands - ABN AMRO, Rabobank and Fortis - have agreed to stop or substantially restrict financing for oil palm development in Indonesia on environmental and social grounds. This is the result of a joint campaign by the Indonesian oil palm advocacy network, Sawit Watch, Milieudefensie (Friends of the Earth NL) and Greenpeace Netherlands following the disastrous 1997/8 forest fires in which10 million hectares of forest land were burnt. Oil palm and pulp plant feeder companies were the main offenders.

Down to Earth No 52, February 2002


The highly-indebted pulp and paper group, Asia Pulp and Paper (APP), commissioned an environmental audit in September to allay fears over rainforest destruction in Sumatra.