Newsletter articles

DTE's quarterly newsletter provides information on ecological justice in Indonesia.

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DTE publications

Down to Earth No. 42, August 1999

East Timor's forests and agricultural lands have suffered extensive damage during the Indonesian occupation. Restoring the environment and setting the country on a development path that is economically viable, socially just and environmentally sustainable will be one of the many formidable challenges facing the government of an independent East Timor.

Down to Earth No. 42, August 1999

Down to Earth No. 42, August 1999

The resumption of plans for logging and oil palm plantations on the biologically and culturally unique island of Siberut show how current 'reform era' measures still allow powerful elites to profit at the expense of indigenous communities.

Down to Earth No. 41, May 1999

The first ever Congress of Indigenous Peoples of the Archipelago has met in Jakarta. A new indigenous peoples' alliance, AMAN, has been launched and the need to address the issue of indigenous peoples has been brought to the attention of the government, the political parties and the public.

Down to Earth No. 39, November 1998

The government has produced a new document on transmigration which describes the 'achievements' of the past twenty five years and outlines the priorities for the future programme.

For almost fifty years, the transmigration programme has meant the violation of rights of indigenous communities whose lands are taken for resettlement sites.

Down to Earth No. 39, November 1998

A World Bank report on the government's project to convert a million hectares of peat swamp forests into rice-lands reveals how appalling the situation on the ground is.

What comes out of the report is the project's total lack of planning and failure to anticipate the economic, social and environmental costs.

Down to Earth No. 39, Nov 1998

People's action to reclaim their land is gathering pace.

The protests in the weeks immediately surrounding the fall of Suharto were largely mounted by urban-based students, workers and professional groups. Land reform - if mentioned – came at the end of lists of demands for the removal of the president, moves against corruption and reduced food prices.