Indonesia

Indonesia has great natural wealth but many of its citizens live in extreme poverty. Democratic progress has been made since the resigation of former president Suharto in 1998, but many civil society organisations feel that far too little progress has been made towards sustainable management of the country's resources, and ensuring that Indonesia's diverse communities have a real say in decisions which affect their future.

Down to Earth No. 58, August 2003


Meanwhile, the need to bring about fundamental reform is not addressed.

The international environmental campaigning NGO Greenpeace believes that Indonesia has the world's highest rate of forest loss. Even Indonesian government ministers now admit publicly that deforestation in the country is out of control. "While we might still be having problems with environmental issues like flooding, forest fires and pollution, we nevertheless think we can find a way out.

Down to Earth No 58  August 2003


Shrimp exports from developing countries - including Indonesia - are bringing foreign exchange earnings to exporter governments and profits to entrepreneurs. But the real price is being paid by communities whose coastal resources are wrecked both by commercial shrimp farms and shrimp trawling.

Forestry Minister Prakosa warned in May this year against the total destruction of mangrove forests in Indonesia. He said that strong determination and commitment was required to prevent further damage.

Down to Earth No 58  August 2003


Indonesia is being pushed by powerful mining multinationals to open up protected forests for mining, but the international campaign to prevent yet more forest destruction is gaining momentum.

A final decision on whether or not companies can mine in Indonesia's protected forests - putting at risk some of the most biodiverse ecosystems in the world - is expected to be issued by Indonesia's parliament soon.

An Indonesian NGO coalition, led by mining advocacy network, JATAM, is campaigning to ma

Down to Earth No 57  May 2003


Indigenous Peoples walked out of a meeting with the British government aid agency, DFID, in March, in response to a controversial statement by a senior Indonesian government forestry official.

Around a hundred people from indigenous groups, local communities and supporting organisations refused to continue DFID's second annual Multi-stakeholder Forestry Programme meeting in Yogyakarta following comments by the Indonesian forestry ministry's secretary general.

Down to Earth No 57  May 2003


The next Annual Meeting of Indonesia's Peoples' Consultative Assembly (MPR) - Indonesia's highest legislative body - will be held in August 2003. One important item on the agenda is to the evaluation of the outstanding MPR Decrees (TAP MPR), including Decree No. IX/MPR/2001 on Agrarian Renewal and Natural Resources. The session will decide which decrees will move forward through the legal process to become laws and which ones must be cancelled.

The possible revocation of the MPR's Decree No.

Down to Earth No 57  May 2003


A study by Indonesian and international experts has highlighted the marginalised position of indigenous peoples in Indonesia. The study reveals how, despite post-Suharto reforms, indigenous land and resource rights continue to be violated by logging and plantation companies.

Down to Earth No 56  February 2003


As Indonesia's forest crisis deepens, the environmental campaigning organisation, WALHI, has made a strong appeal to international donors to support a moratorium on industrial logging across Indonesia.

WALHI launched an attack on corrupt politicians and their cronies responsible for the worsening deforestation in Indonesia.