Mining, oil & gas

Down to Earth Special Issue, October 1999

The Indigenous Peoples' Congress was held only a few weeks after one hundred West Papuan representatives came to Jakarta as part of a long-awaited 'National Dialogue' to discuss the future of their homeland. President Habibie offered nothing. So it was not surprising that the Congress' Papuan contingent was in no mood for compromise. They were united in their message: 'Merdeka' - independence.

Down to Earth Special Issue, October 1999

Two indigenous delegates describe the threats to their communities in South Sumatra

Pak Supriyadi was forced to move to Panglero, near the River Semanggis in Musi Rawas district when his village was taken by over by plantations.

Down to Earth Special Issue, October 1999

This position statement was drawn up by Congress delegates at the end of a week of discussions about issues facing indigenous peoples.

Long before Indonesia became a republic, a panoply of indigenous communities was distributed across the archipelago.

Down to Earth No. 42, August 1999

A new DTE report prepared for Down to Earth by Roger Moody, Nostromo Research, May 1999

Down to Earth No. 42, August 1999

East Timor's forests and agricultural lands have suffered extensive damage during the Indonesian occupation. Restoring the environment and setting the country on a development path that is economically viable, socially just and environmentally sustainable will be one of the many formidable challenges facing the government of an independent East Timor.

Down to Earth No. 39, November 1998

Mobil Oil Indonesia, the country's biggest producer of natural gas, has been linked to serious human rights violations in the war-torn north Sumatran region of Aceh.

Mobil Oil Indonesia is a joint venture between US-based oil giant Mobil and Indonesia's state-owned Pertamina.

Down to Earth No. 39, November 1998

New mining investment has been in the doldrums since last year's Busang fraud and the slump in world metals prices. Japanese investors are pulling in their horns; many Indonesian companies face bankruptcy. In its desperation to attract and keep foreign investment in Indonesia, Habibie's government is giving international mining giants like Newmont and Rio Tinto an easy ride.