Mining, oil & gas

Down to Earth No. 47, November 2000


Mining companies are lobbying to change legislation which prohibits open-pit mining in areas designated as protected forests.

"Forest lands can only be used for development needs other than forestry in Protection and Production Forest areas . . .  No open-pit mining is permissible within Protection Forest areas." 
(Article 38, Forestry Law 41, 1999)

Indonesia's new forestry law, passed last year, prohibits open-pit mining in forests classified as 'protected forests'.

Down to Earth No. 47, November 2000

 

In Brief...


No more forest conversion until forestry plan in place

The forestry ministry has said there will be no further conversion of natural forests for at least two years until a national forest management programme has been approved.

Down to Earth No. 46, August 2000

Another major obstacle to the sustainable management of natural resources is the continuing prominence of the military in many regions. Its continued high profile role from province to village level means that it is a potent threat to the success of regional autonomy, where 'success' means managing local resources sustainably, sharing benefits equitably and respecting human rights.

Down to Earth No. 46, August 2000

In a recent article outlining the history of decentralisation in Indonesia, Trevor Buising states that the changes to be introduced by Law 22 "are not as great as imagined".

Down to Earth No. 45, May 2000

Heavily armed police arrested eleven villagers on March 14th at Aurora Gold's Serjuan mine site in Central Kalimantan. According to an Indonesian NGO report, the villagers - including three children aged between 10 and 12 years - were taken at gun-point into company vehicles and driven to the company's camp. Nine of them, including the children, were then transferred to the North Barito police headquarters at Muara Teweh.

Down to Earth No. 45, May 2000

PT Inco Indonesia, subsidiary of Canada-based Inco Ltd, has come under fire from indigenous communities and the local government over the company's nickel mining operations in Sulawesi.

Down to Earth No. 45, May 2000

The fate of Newmont's Sulawesi gold mine has drawn attention to contracts in the context of moves towards regional autonomy.

PT Newmont Minahasa Raya, 80% owned by Newmont Mining Corp. of the US, operates the mine at Ratatotok, which produces 340 kg of gold a year.