Forests & forest fires

Down to Earth No.75, November 2007


Evidence from local and international NGOs about the impacts of large-scale oil palm plantations on the environment and communities has made some buyers and parliamentarians in Europe realise that palm oil is not the 'green', sustainable product the industry claims.

Down to Earth No.75, November 2007


Aceh's new government is promoting the expansion of oil palm plantations in the province as 'in the interests of the people', but it is by no means clear that local communities will be the main beneficiaries.


A report by the independent research organisation Eye on Aceh examines the growth of oil palm plantations in Aceh and the social, environmental and economic costs of this agribusiness. The Golden Crop?

Down to Earth No. 74, August 2007


Mounting global concern over climate change and the link to deforestation has refocused international attention on the need to protect the world's forests. Rampant forest and peatland destruction in Indonesia means that the country is one of the world's top three emitters of carbon dioxide, a major contributor to global warming.

Down to Earth No. 74, August 2007


Indonesia's forestry department is allocating millions of hectares of land to a new scheme aimed at increasing the supply for wood for the pulp and timber industries, as well as tackling poverty. But serious flaws with the 'peoples plantations' programme are raising concerns that the scheme could do more harm than good.


Indonesia's forestry department announced target figures for 'Peoples Plantations' (Hutan Tanaman Rakyat - HTR) in February this year.

Down to Earth No. 74, August 2007


Indonesia's most prominent environment group, WALHI (Friends of the Earth Indonesia) has repeated its call for a logging moratorium across the country.

Down to Earth No. 73, May 2007


After a long and tortuous process, the working group given the task of agreeing the final version of Legality Standard for Indonesian Timber has completed its work. What its impact will be on the ground, where Indonesia's forests are disappearing fast, remains to be seen.


The final draft of the Indonesian Timber Legality Verification Standard was officially handed over to the Forestry Department at the beginning of February 2007.

Down to Earth No. 73, May 2007


Civil society organisations concerned with the impacts of the pulp and paper industry and its fastwood plantations on people and forests have been discussing the basic demands to be made of industry and governments. Over the last five years, groups in North America followed by those in Europe have drawn up statements of agreed measures to transform the industry to direct their campaigning. Southern NGOs are now engaging in similar initiatives.