Laws & regulations

Down to Earth No 59  November 2003


An interview with Rukka Sombolinggi, from the indigenous people of Toraja in South Sulawesi, works for AMAN's secretariat in Jakarta as campaign co-ordinator. She helped organise the second AMAN Congress.

 

What were the main achievements of the second AMAN Congress?

There were five main aims of the Second AMAN Congress.

Down to Earth No 58  August 2003


Indonesia is being pushed by powerful mining multinationals to open up protected forests for mining, but the international campaign to prevent yet more forest destruction is gaining momentum.

A final decision on whether or not companies can mine in Indonesia's protected forests - putting at risk some of the most biodiverse ecosystems in the world - is expected to be issued by Indonesia's parliament soon.

An Indonesian NGO coalition, led by mining advocacy network, JATAM, is campaigning to ma

Down to Earth No. 58, August 2003

PT IMK will not have to pay compensation for throwing people out of their mining areas.

 
by Erma S. Ranik


"Since the beginning of IMK's operations, fish have become scarce because IMK has polluted the river and our livestock can no longer graze because IMK has destroyed the area.

Down to Earth No. 58, August 2003


Meanwhile, the need to bring about fundamental reform is not addressed.

The international environmental campaigning NGO Greenpeace believes that Indonesia has the world's highest rate of forest loss. Even Indonesian government ministers now admit publicly that deforestation in the country is out of control. "While we might still be having problems with environmental issues like flooding, forest fires and pollution, we nevertheless think we can find a way out.

Down to Earth No 58  August 2003


Shrimp exports from developing countries - including Indonesia - are bringing foreign exchange earnings to exporter governments and profits to entrepreneurs. But the real price is being paid by communities whose coastal resources are wrecked both by commercial shrimp farms and shrimp trawling.

Forestry Minister Prakosa warned in May this year against the total destruction of mangrove forests in Indonesia. He said that strong determination and commitment was required to prevent further damage.

Down to Earth No 56  February 2003

With major new oil and gas developments planned for Sulawesi, there is growing concern about the likely impacts on local livelihoods, forests, rare wildlife and the fragile marine ecosystem.

Central Sulawesi is being billed as Indonesia's next big gas producer by Indonesian companies with exploration projects in the province. Indonesia's state-owned oil and gas company, Pertamina, and Exspan Tomori Sulawesi - a subsidiary of Medco (see box) - say the province has huge potential for natural gas exploitation.

Down to Earth No 56  February 2003


As Indonesia's forest crisis deepens, the environmental campaigning organisation, WALHI, has made a strong appeal to international donors to support a moratorium on industrial logging across Indonesia.

WALHI launched an attack on corrupt politicians and their cronies responsible for the worsening deforestation in Indonesia.