REDD

DTE 84, March 2010

By Pang Yuriun, Coordinator of Aceh's Indigenous Peoples' Network (JKMA).

Accepting REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation) schemes as a necessary means to combat global warming bears a series of consequences for all of us. First, measures undertaken under the REDD mechanism need to be an integral part of an overall strategy to combat illegal logging and reduce the rate of forest destruction and degradation.

Down to Earth No.84, March 2010

Indonesia's forestry minister has announced that millions of hectares of 'new forests' will be planted.

Down to Earth No.83, December 2009

In August, Indonesia's National Climate Change Council (DNPI) announced the results of a draft study which includes a series of projections for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reductions and compares these with 'business as usual' scenarios.

Down to Earth No.83, December 2009

By Chris Lang.1


Indonesia's President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono likes to make promises. Particularly at international meetings.

Down to Earth No.83, December 2009

Despite urgent calls for action from civil society, climate scientists and governments of some of the most vulnerable countries, the pace of progress towards a new international climate deal has been frustratingly slow.

Down to Earth No.82, September 2009

As Indonesia pushes ahead with plans for REDD, the World Bank and others are making ill-prepared agreements on funding projects in Indonesia.

Down to Earth No.82, September 2009

A DTE interview with Giorgio Budi Indrarto, Coordinator of Indonesia's Civil Society Forum for Climate Justice.