Indonesia

Indonesia has great natural wealth but many of its citizens live in extreme poverty. Democratic progress has been made since the resigation of former president Suharto in 1998, but many civil society organisations feel that far too little progress has been made towards sustainable management of the country's resources, and ensuring that Indonesia's diverse communities have a real say in decisions which affect their future.

Down to Earth No. 42 1999

The Central Kalimantan Mega-project, or 'PLG', as it is known in Indonesia, has been an unmitigated disaster. The ecology and biodiversity of a vast area has been devastated; indigenous communities have lost their resources and livelihoods; and the transmigrant families who were brought in to work on the project remain dependent on government assistance as their harvests fail repeatedly.

Down to Earth No. 41, May 1999

Farmers, workers, indigenous peoples, fisherfolk, NGOs, students and academics are coming together to formulate people-centred, environmentally sound development strategies to replace the obsolete, bankrupt and abusive money-centred practices of the Suharto era.

Down to Earth No 40, February 1999

A number of factors are forcing the pace of reforms in forestry policy in Indonesia: many logging concessions have expired or will do so soon; the devastating 1997/8 forest fires; the corruption revealed in the aftermath of Suharto's resignation; the pressure for increased revenues from the forestry and plantation sectors from the economic crisis; loan conditions imposed by international donors; the ITTO's goal of sustainable logging by 20

Down to Earth No. 39, November 1998

New mining investment has been in the doldrums since last year's Busang fraud and the slump in world metals prices. Japanese investors are pulling in their horns; many Indonesian companies face bankruptcy. In its desperation to attract and keep foreign investment in Indonesia, Habibie's government is giving international mining giants like Newmont and Rio Tinto an easy ride.

Down to Earth No. 38, August 1998

In post-Suharto Indonesia, the reform movement is pushing for a new, clean government and demanding that the nation's rich resources are returned to the control of the people. Down to Earth salutes the reform movement and supports the forces for democracy and ecological justice in their struggle for a better future!

Down to Earth No. 36 February 1998

The rapid expansion of oil palm plantations is enriching the entrepreneurs but impoverishing farmers whose lands are taken over for development.