Climate justice

Climate justice means equitable solutions to climate change which are based on the rights, needs, participation, and agreement of the communities who are feeling the greatest impact of climate change or who will be affected by mitigation attempts.

Climate justice and sustainable livelihoods are closely linked, since community management of resources that support livelihoods offers a better chance of long term sustainability than top-down development schemes which serve the interests of national and international business elites, and reinforce global inequality.

Indonesian civil society protest in Copenhagen, December 2009

According to an Opinion issued by a panel of 19 top European scientists, existing targets for agrofuels and other forms of bioenergy are based on “flawed” carbon accounting and the “potential consequences …are immense”.[1]

DTE Update, November 29, 2011

Joint submission to the UN's Universal Periodic Review (UPR) of human rights by 10 national and international CSOs

In January 2011, DTE published an update on the European Union’s (EU) policy developments regarding Renewable Energy Directive (RED) (2009/28/EC) and the Fuel Quality Directive.

Nuffield Council calls for ‘ethical suitability’ for agrofuels

See also DTE agrofuels update, July 2011

Pressure on European Union Member Stat

In 2010, the agrofuels debate centred on growing evidence showing that iLUC could significantly reduce greenhouse gas saving potential of agrofuels, when compared with fossil fuels.

Commission admits doubts over agrofuels green credentials - but delays further action

At the close of business, 2010, the European Commission formally acknowledged that Indirect Land Use Change (ILUC) can reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions savings of agrofuels and bioliquids – but delayed further action until June 2011.

DTE Update, May 2010

In Indonesia, oil palm plantations are associated with poverty, human rights abuses, the takeover of indigenous territory, forest and peatland destruction, biodiversity collapse and high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. Plantation expansion is being driven partly by the rising demand for agrofuels from the EU and other countries.

This update provides information on what is happening at the European end of the agrofuels story.