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DTE's quarterly newsletter provides information on ecological justice in Indonesia.

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DTE publications

Down to Earth No 61  May 2004

Reports surrounding the deaths of 13 unauthorised miners at the Pongkor gold mine, West Java, indicate how poverty, corruption and inhumane security methods may be contributing to the high death toll.

The underground Pongkor gold mine in Nanggung district, near Bogor, is operated by state-owned mining company PT Aneka Tambang. The thirteen men, plus one company employee, died of asphyxiation after their mining tunnels were filled with smoke.

Down to Earth No 60  February 2004


Indonesia's peasant farmers are being forced off their lands to make way for large-scale plantations, mining, forestry and industrial projects.

Down to Earth No 60  February 2004


The following position statement by KAKKaPP was sent in January 2004 to the forestry authorities in Randublatung and the head of police in Blora, with copies to the head of Indonesia's Chief of Police, the chair of the National Commission for Human Rights, the chief executive of state forestry company Perhutani, all police chiefs and governors in Java and the district administrator and head of the district assembly for Blora.

It concerns human rights abuses by Perhutani against local people relate

 

Fatal chemical explosion, East Java

WALHI East Java has called for a halt to production and an investigation into PT Petrowidada following an explosion at the company's chemical plant on January 20 which resulted in two dead, 50 others severely injured, and dozens evacuated from the surrounding area. A joint investigation by WALHI East Java and other local groups has documented several past explosions.

Down to Earth No 59  November 2003


By Idham Kurniawan* In March this year, a new regional organisation for Indigenous Peoples on Java was established - Paguyuban Masyarakat Adat Pulau Java, or PAMA PUJA.

When we talk about Indigenous Peoples, many people immediately think of people who live in remote areas on islands outside Java, such as Kalimantan and Papua. They think that on Java, there are no longer peoples who live according to traditional values and who hold on firmly to theiradat (customary) way of life.

Down to Earth No 59  November 2003


Interview with Idham Kurniawan

 

What are the main problems facing Masyarakat Adat [indigenous peoples] in Java today?

The main problem is that they have no recognition of their customary territory and much of this has been taken over - mainly by Perhutani (state-owned forestry company) - for plantations. The second problem is the government's failure to recognise their adat beliefs and institutions.

Down to Earth No 59  November 2003


A notorious dam project, designed during the Suharto era, is due to go ahead next year despite opposition from local people and NGOs supporting them.

The Jatigede dam, in Sumedang, West Java, is being billed as the answer to flooding and drought problems in the northern lowlands of West Java. The government claims it will provide 90,000 hectares of farmland with irrigated water, increase the rice harvest as well as generate electricity for industry and supply clean drinking water for residents.