Newsletter articles

DTE's quarterly newsletter provides information on ecological justice in Indonesia.

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DTE publications

Down to Earth No 65  May 2005

An NGO report shows how West Papua's rich, extensive forests are being stripped to satisfy China's demand for timber. The Indonesia government, keen to demonstrate to the international community that it is taking illegal logging and timber smuggling seriously, responded by promising action against corrupt military, police and forestry personnel.

Down to Earth No 65  May 2005

Notes from a discussion between DTE and Alex Sanggenafa, focal point for the Alliance of Indigenous Peoples of the Archipelago (AMAN) for Yapen Waropen, Papua.

 

AMAN and indigenous peoples: challenges in the Papuan context

Papuans' mistrust of the Indonesian government remains as deep as ever; they still tend to ask what hidden agenda lies behind any government efforts to win their hearts and minds.

Down to Earth No 65  May 2005

In February 2004, DTE took a detailed look at BP's controversial gas project in Bintuni Bay, West Papua. One year on, we ask how far concerns over human rights, security and local people's rights have been addressed.

The Tangguh gas extraction and liquid natural gas (LNG) installation in the Bird's Head region of West Papua got the final go-ahead from BP on March 7th. As a result, the area will experience massive social, environmental and economic changes.

Down to Earth No 65  May 2005

Status of the project

The 'final investment decision' to proceed with Tangguh came on March 7th, after many delays. The construction phase of the US$5 billion project is now expected to start in late 2005. Tangguh will be operational in 2008, with two full gas production units or 'trains' (Reuters7/Mar/05, TIAP 2004).

Down to Earth No. 60, February 2004

With the political context worsening and militarisation in West Papua increasing, BP's commitments to human rights and its 'community-based security policy'- look more and more flimsy.

In 2003, West Papua continued to suffer the impacts of Indonesian military repression.

Down to Earth No 59  November 2003


The Alliance of Indigenous Peoples of the Archipelago (AMAN) held its second congress in Lombok in September. The five-day Congress was attended by around 500 indigenous delegates from across Indonesia and West Papua plus several hundred members of local indigenous groups and supporting NGOs, academics and representatives of government agencies. The themes discussed included recognition of land and resource rights, respect for indigenous beliefs and practices and adat self-governance.

Down to Earth No 58  August 2003


An interview with Erma Suryani Ranik, volunteer for AMA Kalbar (Indigenous Peoples Alliance, West Kalimantan), who has been visiting the UK and Norway as part of DTE's programme with the indigenous peoples alliance, AMAN.

 

What are the main problems facing indigenous peoples in West Kalimantan?

The main problem is that our land rights are not being recognised.