Climate justice

Climate justice means equitable solutions to climate change which are based on the rights, needs, participation, and agreement of the communities who are feeling the greatest impact of climate change or who will be affected by mitigation attempts.

Climate justice and sustainable livelihoods are closely linked, since community management of resources that support livelihoods offers a better chance of long term sustainability than top-down development schemes which serve the interests of national and international business elites, and reinforce global inequality.

Indonesian civil society protest in Copenhagen, December 2009

In 2010, the agrofuels debate centred on growing evidence showing that iLUC could significantly reduce greenhouse gas saving potential of agrofuels, when compared with fossil fuels.

Mr. Greg Barker MP

July 6, 2011

Dear Mr. Barker,

Re: UK government action to address environmental and human rights impacts of agrofuels

I am writing on behalf of Down to Earth Indonesia, an NGO working with partners internationally to promote climate justice and sustainable livelihoods in Indonesia.

In January 2011, DTE published an update on the European Union’s (EU) policy developments regarding Renewable Energy Directive (RED) (2009/28/EC) and the Fuel Quality Directive.

DTE 88, April 2011

In the last few years, DTE has been working with local communities in Indonesia to follow the international negotiations on climate change.

Press Release, Civil Society forum (CSF) for Climate Justice

Jakarta- Indonesia, March 23st, 2011.

Indonesia’s parliament has noted that during 2008 to 2010 the Government’s climate change debt to Japan, France and the World Bank for climate change-related loans amounted to USD 1.907 billion. Yet the public do not know what these funds are being used for. Meanwhile, fisherfolk, farmers and fi

Commission admits doubts over agrofuels green credentials - but delays further action

At the close of business, 2010, the European Commission formally acknowledged that Indirect Land Use Change (ILUC) can reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions savings of agrofuels and bioliquids – but delayed further action until June 2011.

Down to Earth 87, December 2010

An Indonesian activist perspective on renewable energy, following a visit to a community wind project in Belgium.
 
By Siti Maimunah & Kahar Al Bahri - JATAM