Laws & regulations

Down to Earth Special Issue, October 1999

Logistically and tactically, the Indigenous Peoples' Congress was a tremendous achievement. It generated hope, confidence, new insights and useful connections amongst indigenous peoples facing similar problems right across the archipelago at a time when there are real possibilities for more democracy and equity in Indonesian society. Politically and organisationally, these are early days for Indonesia's indigenous movement.

Down to Earth Special Issue, October 1999

Through the Congress and subsequent events, indigenous peoples have presented their demands to government officials, political parties and the National Human Rights Commission. They have done this directly and through demonstrations, press statements and delegations. Such action was impossible in the Suharto years when open discussion of land rights was branded communist or subversive.

Down to Earth Special Issue, October 1999

Although only 20 of the 208 Congress delegates were women, this small contingent made a much greater impact than these numbers suggest. Women from Kalimantan, Sumba, Timor, Sulawesi, North Sumatra and and West Papua who had never met before banded together and challenged other participants to recognise their place in indigenous societies and their values, problems and solutions.

Down to Earth Special Issue, October 1999

At the Congress, delegates drew up work plans for AMAN based on priorities identified in earlier discussions. Their draft programme was presented in a plenary session and the following plan of action agreed. As five sub-groups had worked independently there is some overlap between sections.

Down to Earth Special Issue, October 1999

This position statement was drawn up by Congress delegates at the end of a week of discussions about issues facing indigenous peoples.

Long before Indonesia became a republic, a panoply of indigenous communities was distributed across the archipelago.

Down to Earth No. 42, August 1999

Almost all of the 48 parties which contested Indonesia's June elections have failed to show the commitment to community rights and the environment that is needed for the sound management of the country's natural resources.

Down to Earth No. 42, August 1999