Economy & debt

Down to Earth No.76-77, May 2008


This May marks the tenth anniversary of Suharto's fall from power. The former president, who headed a military regime which ruled Indonesia for 32 years, died in January this year aged 86.

Down to Earth No. 74, August 2007


The Jambi-based NGO, SETARA, which focuses on issues related to livelihoods, energy, natural resources and foreign investment, distributed a position paper on Indonesia's palm oil supplies in May. It was headed with a quote from Cuba's former leader, Fidel Castro, that the use of food crops to produce fuels would cause rising prices and hunger for millions of people in developing countries.

Down to Earth No. 74, August 2007

 

The final draft of a revised 'corporates' bill was given the nod by Indonesia's House of Representatives (DPR) on 20 July, 2007. This marked the passing of the bill, which replaces the old Limited Liability Company Law, (No.1,1995). The new Limited Liability Company Law, alongside the revised Investment Law (see DTE 73), is designed to update company legislation and is part of a bundle of regulations and statutes being enacted to make the country more attractive to new investment.

Down to Earth No. 74, August 2007


Indonesia's most prominent environment group, WALHI (Friends of the Earth Indonesia) has repeated its call for a logging moratorium across the country.

Down to Earth No. 73, May 2007


The Indonesian parliament passed a new investment law in March, despite strong civil society opposition and despite much concern over its implications.

Down to Earth No. 72 March 2007

CGI creditor group disbanded

Indonesia's creditor group, the Consultative Group on Indonesia, has been disbanded after President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono said it was no longer needed. The January announcement was officially welcomed the World Bank, former CGI chair and one of Indonesia's three main creditors alongside the Asian Development Bank and Japan.

Down to Earth No. 72 March 2007

Two significant changes to national regulations on mining are due to affect the mining industry in Indonesia. The mining minister, Simon Sembiring, said recently that the Indonesian government was intending to approve laws to ensure that more of the mineral resources mined in Indonesia will be processed within Indonesia rather than be shipped abroad. As well as this, new laws are due to come into force in early 2007 that will strengthen the role of regional governments in assigning and approving mining contracts in their regions.