Coal mining is bringing devastation to landscapes and livelihoods in Kalimantan, where a coal-rush is in full swing. Indonesia is now the world's largest exporter of thermal coal - supplying power stations and generating electricity in India, China, Europe and many other countries around the world.

DTE is campaigning against UK involvement in Indonesia's coal rush. We need to reduce demand for coal in order to protect livelihoods in Kalimantan as well as reduce UK greenhouse gas emissions.

Bumi Resources' giant Kaltim Prima coal mine in East Kalimantan. (Photo:JATAM)

October 24th, 2013

Extract from 'Initial reflections on the 2013 BHP Billiton AGM', by Andy Whitmore, on behalf of the London Mining Network

Click here for the full post

Press Release by Down to Earth and London Mining Network

London, Tuesday 22nd October 2013

The board of controversial mining giant BHP Billiton is set to be slammed at its AGM by an Indonesian activist over seven coal concessions collectively covering an area of more than 350,000 hectares in the relatively unspoilt rainforest centre of the island of Borneo. Part of this project overlaps the transnational Heart of Borneo conservation area, described by the Asian Development Bank as “the lungs of Southeast Asia".

Press release: Down to Earth, London Mining Network and the Indonesian Mining Advocacy Network (JATAM).

London, June 26th 2013

Much of the talk at today’s Bumi plc AGM will centre on the company’s deep financial and governance woes, but it is the people most directly affected by Bumi’s coal-mining operations that need to be heard.

London Mining Network, in consultation with JATAM (the Indonesian mining advocacy network) has developed the following Draft Declaration on Coal Mining. Many organisations have rightly drawn attention to coal’s contribution to destructive climate change.

Released for publication on September 20, 2001

* Refuting the unsustainable claims of the mining industry
* Opposing current models of "engagement"
* Demanding full recognition of community rights

We - twenty four representatives of communities and groups affected by mining from Asia-Pacific, Africa, India, South and North America - met in London from May 18-23rd 2001, to compare the impacts of mining on the lives of communities and ecosystems and to share strategies on how to confront the industry.