Down to Earth 87, December 2010

DTE's Clare McVeigh with protestors from Food not Fuel

DTE Update, May 2010

In Indonesia, oil palm plantations are associated with poverty, human rights abuses, the takeover of indigenous territory, forest and peatland destruction, biodiversity collapse and high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. Plantation expansion is being driven partly by the rising demand for agrofuels from the EU and other countries.

This update provides information on what is happening at the European end of the agrofuels story.

Down to Earth No.84, March 2010

There was a time when public debates around palm oil centred mainly on food ingredients and cosmetics. Today the focus of the debate has shifted to the use of palm oil for electricity and heat generation as well as for transport.

In the last couple of months the UK has seen a nation-wide wave of planning applications for agrofuels-based power stations. Two energy companies W4B Renewable Energy and Vo-gen, mention palm oil as fuel source in their applications, while others have not legally ruled it out.

Down to Earth No.83, December 2009

By Chris Lang.1

Indonesia's President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono likes to make promises. Particularly at international meetings.

Down to Earth No.82, September 2009

European countries are turning to agrofuels for energy and transport as part of their strategy to move away from fossil fuels and meet greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets. The use of palm oil as an agrofuel source has drawn strong criticism due to the severe social, environmental and negative climate change impacts, which contradict industry claims that it is a 'green' fuel.

Down to Earth No.80-81, June 2009

The following letter was addressed to Ed Miliband, Britain's Secretary of State for the Department of Energy and Climate Change. The letter raises questions about a UK-Indonesia Memorandum of Understanding on climate change signed in December 2008.1