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DTE's quarterly newsletter provides information on ecological justice in Indonesia.

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DTE publications

DTE 98, March 2014

Indecision and uncertainty on EU biofuels policy persists, as communities in Indonesia continue to suffer the impacts of oil palm expansion.

Snapshots from a year of campaigns

DTE 98, March 2014

Focusing public attention on the devastating impacts on communities, environment and climate of coal mining and agrofuels featured prominently in DTE’s work over the last year.

DTE 96-97, December 2013

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Agrofuels: impacts in Indonesia, time for policy change in Europe, DTE Special Edition newsletter

DTE 96-97, December 2013

Biofuels - once promoted as the silver bullet for climate change - have turned out to be one of the European Union’s biggest policy mistakes.

DTE 96-97, December 2013

A crucial vote on biofuels in the European Parliament on September 11th 2013 has failed to fix a flawed policy which is driving deforestation, landgrabbing and human rights abuse, while undermining communities' food sovereignty in producer countries like Indonesia.

DTE 96-97, December 2013

Bondan Andriyanu of Sawit Watch, visited Berlin, Brussels and Strasbourg in September 2013. The aim was to convey to Europe’s policymakers the urgent need to reform the EU’s policies on agrofuels due to their harmful impacts in Indonesia.

Prior to the trip to Europe, DTE interviewed Bondan about his organisation, and his intentions in Europe.

DTE 96-97, December2013

Despite progress in international policies and the regulatory frameworks, despite commitments from political financial and industry leaders, these businesses are responsible for rampant forest destruction for oil palm and timber plantations, stealing from indigenous peoples, encroaching on their lands and resources, and destroying their culture and identity.