Kalimantan

 

 

Down to Earth No. 72 March 2007

CGI creditor group disbanded

Indonesia's creditor group, the Consultative Group on Indonesia, has been disbanded after President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono said it was no longer needed. The January announcement was officially welcomed the World Bank, former CGI chair and one of Indonesia's three main creditors alongside the Asian Development Bank and Japan.

Down to Earth No. 70, August 2006

A dramatic rise in the price of nickel is prompting the development of a major new nickel mine in Sulawesi. What will be the impacts for local people and their environment?

The Indonesian government and Anglo-Australian mining multinational Rio Tinto are negotiating the terms of a contract to develop the La Sampala nickel deposit on the borders of Southeast and Central Sulawesi. Spokesman for Rio Tinto in Indonesia, Anang R Noor, said the company plans to invest US$1 billion in the project.

Down to Earth No 67  November 2005

Four leading Indonesian NGOs organised a workshop and seminar in early October on the policy implications of natural resource exploitation in Kalimantan. The meeting was attended by representatives of various communities affected by large-scale plantation and mining projects plus 21 NGOs from Kalimantan and 2 from Sarawak.

Down to Earth No 65  May 2005

UK-based mining company Rio Tinto closed the Kelian gold mine in East Kalimantan in February this year after 13 years of operation.

The mine was developed on land owned by indigenous Dayak communities who were given no choice but to move.

Down to Earth No 62   August 2004

Community holds Newmont to account
Villagers from Buyat Bay, North Sulawesi have lodged complaints with the police over the devastating health impacts of Newmont Minahasa Raya's gold mine. At least 30 people are believed to have died as a result of the heavy metal pollution caused by the mine, which dumps tailings on the sea-bed.

Down to Earth No 61  May 2004


Local people, supported by an indigenous organisation, disrupted the coal-mining operations of Australian-owned PT Bahari Cakrawala Sebuku in February, to protest against the impacts of mining on the island of Sebuku, off South Kalimantan.

The February protest, which involved local people supported by the South Kalimantan Indigenous People's Union (PERMADA) and local NGOs, blocked a mining road at the Sebuku coal mine.

Down to Earth No 58  August 2003


An interview with Erma Suryani Ranik, volunteer for AMA Kalbar (Indigenous Peoples Alliance, West Kalimantan), who has been visiting the UK and Norway as part of DTE's programme with the indigenous peoples alliance, AMAN.

 

What are the main problems facing indigenous peoples in West Kalimantan?

The main problem is that our land rights are not being recognised.