Land and food security

Down to Earth No 63  November 2004

By Ulfa Hidayati, RMI (The Indonesian Institute for Forest and Environment). (Abridged translation by DTE)

The capitalist economy has dominated ecological, social and cultural aspects of local peoples' lives in the Halimun ecosystem which covers part of Bogor, Sukabumi and Lebak districts, West Java.

Down to Earth No 62  August 2004

Indonesia's new plantation law, aimed at providing legal certainty for investors, will do nothing to address conflicts between local communities and companies. It could well make things worse.

The Plantations Bill was endorsed by Indonesia's national parliament on 12th July, two years after it was tabled.

Down to Earth No 60  February 2004


Indonesia's peasant farmers are being forced off their lands to make way for large-scale plantations, mining, forestry and industrial projects.

Down to Earth No 60  February 2004


The following position statement by KAKKaPP was sent in January 2004 to the forestry authorities in Randublatung and the head of police in Blora, with copies to the head of Indonesia's Chief of Police, the chair of the National Commission for Human Rights, the chief executive of state forestry company Perhutani, all police chiefs and governors in Java and the district administrator and head of the district assembly for Blora.

It concerns human rights abuses by Perhutani against local people relate

Down to Earth No 59  November 2003


Interview with Idham Kurniawan

 

What are the main problems facing Masyarakat Adat [indigenous peoples] in Java today?

The main problem is that they have no recognition of their customary territory and much of this has been taken over - mainly by Perhutani (state-owned forestry company) - for plantations. The second problem is the government's failure to recognise their adat beliefs and institutions.

Down to Earth No 59  November 2003


A notorious dam project, designed during the Suharto era, is due to go ahead next year despite opposition from local people and NGOs supporting them.

The Jatigede dam, in Sumedang, West Java, is being billed as the answer to flooding and drought problems in the northern lowlands of West Java. The government claims it will provide 90,000 hectares of farmland with irrigated water, increase the rice harvest as well as generate electricity for industry and supply clean drinking water for residents.

Down to Earth No 59  November 2003


By Idham Kurniawan* In March this year, a new regional organisation for Indigenous Peoples on Java was established - Paguyuban Masyarakat Adat Pulau Java, or PAMA PUJA.

When we talk about Indigenous Peoples, many people immediately think of people who live in remote areas on islands outside Java, such as Kalimantan and Papua. They think that on Java, there are no longer peoples who live according to traditional values and who hold on firmly to theiradat (customary) way of life.