Kalimantan

 

 

Down to Earth No 63  November 2004

The case of Nyayat village, as told in a new Indonesian-language publication by Indonesian NGO, PENA. Summary translation by DTE.

Nyayat is a hamlet in Sambas district, West Kalimantan, of only 200 Dayak Bekati. To outside eyes, it looks much like any other small village in the province. Most of its inhabitants farm the land traditionally and tap native rubber. The striking difference is that these villagers have refused to accept oil palm plantations on their land.

Down to Earth No 62 August 2004

Efforts to secure protection for local communities under a new timber trade standard may be undermined by an emergency decree on illegal logging.

In 2002, the Indonesian and British governments signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to combat illegal logging and the illegal timber trade.

Down to Earth No 62 August 2004

A group of thirty Indonesian and international NGOs have called for the cancellation of South Kalimantan's first pulp mill project.

Down to Earth No 62   August 2004

Community holds Newmont to account
Villagers from Buyat Bay, North Sulawesi have lodged complaints with the police over the devastating health impacts of Newmont Minahasa Raya's gold mine. At least 30 people are believed to have died as a result of the heavy metal pollution caused by the mine, which dumps tailings on the sea-bed.

Down to Earth No 61  May 2004


Local people, supported by an indigenous organisation, disrupted the coal-mining operations of Australian-owned PT Bahari Cakrawala Sebuku in February, to protest against the impacts of mining on the island of Sebuku, off South Kalimantan.

The February protest, which involved local people supported by the South Kalimantan Indigenous People's Union (PERMADA) and local NGOs, blocked a mining road at the Sebuku coal mine.

Down to Earth No 59  November 2003


What does 'good practice' in timber certification really mean?

"Greenwashed Indonesian Wood Hits U.S. Market" was the headline of the Rainforest Action Network's press release when the first shipment of meranti from a 'good practice' pilot project sanctioned by WWF arrived in August. This tropical hardwood had come from PT Suka Jaya Makmur (SJM), part of the Alas Kusuma Group, which owns a plymill and concession in the Ketapang district of West Kalimantan.

Down to Earth No. 58, August 2003

PT IMK will not have to pay compensation for throwing people out of their mining areas.

 
by Erma S. Ranik


"Since the beginning of IMK's operations, fish have become scarce because IMK has polluted the river and our livestock can no longer graze because IMK has destroyed the area.