Down to Earth No.78, August 2008

Mardiana, better known as Etek, works for PT Agro Masang Perkasa in Agam district, West Sumatra. She has been working there since 1994 and will continue to do so as there are no other jobs she could do to sustain herself and her family. This brief report is based on an interview with Etek during June 2008 in Bogor.

"Before, whenever anything got in my eye, I rubbed it. This is what it's like now - like the eye of a salted fish," she says.

Down to Earth No. 74, August 2007

The position and role of indigenous women facing development aggression.

By Devi Anggraini1


Why does the government issue licences for investors to take away our livelihoods? We can't exist without our livelihoods.

Down to Earth No. 74, August 2007

The social and environmental impacts of large-scale oil palm plantations in Indonesia have been exposed by national and international civil society organisations. But women's experiences have received far less attention.

Down to Earth No 66  August 2005

Indigenous peoples' organisations are raising awareness of the negative impacts of large-scale plantations among their communities in West Kalimantan - a move that challenges powerful government and business interests.

A March meeting of indigenous communities from West Kalimantan discussed the downside of the provincial government's plan for a massive expansion in oil palm plantations.

Down to Earth No 65  May 2005

Status of the project

The 'final investment decision' to proceed with Tangguh came on March 7th, after many delays. The construction phase of the US$5 billion project is now expected to start in late 2005. Tangguh will be operational in 2008, with two full gas production units or 'trains' (Reuters7/Mar/05, TIAP 2004).

Down to Earth No 65  May 2005

Indonesian government attempt to block West Papua solidarity meeting

Representatives from Asian countries including Thailand, South Korea, Indonesia, East Timor, Burma, Sri Lanka and the Philippines joined others from the USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the UK and Ireland for an international solidarity meeting on West Papua in April/May.

Down to Earth No 64  March 2005

Far more women, children and the elderly died in the quake-tsunami than teenagers and men. In Lambada village, there were only 105 survivors from a population of over 2,100; of these only 5 were women. This is not atypical. The overall gender balance in Aceh may have been changed by 20% or more.

The reasons why so many women died may never be known. Many stayed to save their children when the first tsunami struck. Others could not run fast enough to higher ground while carrying babies and toddlers.