Climate Justice and sustainable livelihoods

DTE is campaigning for climate justice. We want equitable solutions to climate change which are based on the rights, needs, participation, and agreement of the communities who are feeling the greatest impact of climate change or who will be affected by mitigation attempts.

We believe that community management of natural resources that support livelihoods offers a better chance of long term sustainability than top-down development schemes which serve the interests of business elites and reinforce global inequality.

Banner in both languages

DTE's new Indonesian-language book, Keadilan Iklim dan Penghidupan yang Berkelanjutan Jilid II (Climate Justice and Sustainable Livelihoods 2nd Edition) is updated from the 2009 book.

It consists of DTE newsletter articles on the themes of climate justice, climate change developments in Indonesia, energy and renewable energy; and sustainable livelihoods. 

To view the PDF version, click here.

To request a hard copy, please contact

DTE 89-90, November 2011

...and some hopes for securing sustainable livelihoods.

Notes from a workshop co-organised by LP3BH, Yalhimo, Mnukwar, DTE and PPP.

Mpur Peoples and development

a film by Mnukwar

with support from DTE

This new film explores the views of the Mpur community, West Papua, on development plans for their region which will affect their land, livelihoods and culture.

Press Release, Civil Society forum (CSF) for Climate Justice

Jakarta- Indonesia, March 23st, 2011.

Indonesia’s parliament has noted that during 2008 to 2010 the Government’s climate change debt to Japan, France and the World Bank for climate change-related loans amounted to USD 1.907 billion. Yet the public do not know what these funds are being used for. Meanwhile, fisherfolk, farmers and fi

Down to Earth No.84, March 2010 

Don't buy or invest in Indonesian pulp and paper

An open letter from Indonesian CSOs sent in March calls on consumers of, and investors in, Indonesia's pulp and paper to halt existing investments and refrain from new investments and purchases from pulp and paper companies until there is evidence of real reform in the sector.

Down to Earth 83, December 2009

While crucial climate talks proceed at international level, how are the lives of local communities being affected by climate change? In November, Indonesia's Civil Society Forum for Climate Justice held two Climate Hearings in Jakarta to try and present some answers to this question. The following is adapted from DTE's translation of a new CSF report 'From Krui to Timor - how farmers and fishing communities are facing climate change'.

Down to Earth No.83, December 2009

The following is an abridged translation of an Indonesian-language article by M. Riza Damanik and Abdul Halim.1