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DTE's quarterly newsletter provides information on ecological justice in Indonesia.

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DTE publications

DTE, October 31st, 2014

This Indonesian language discussion was broadcast on October 30th to mark the launch of DTE's 100th edition newsletter, Fair enough? Women, men, communities and ecological justice in Indonesia.

The four women discussing gender justice with their KBR 68 hosts are: Siti Maimunah (SAINS), Betty Tio Minar (DTE), Ratri Kusumohartono (Sawit Watch) and Puspa Dewi (Solidaritas Perempuan).

The broadcast, which also invites callers to phone in, and responds to their questions, starts 3.09 minutes into the file.

Fair enough? Women, men, communities and ecological justice in Indonesia

DTE Special Edition Newsletter 99-100, October 2014

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DTE 99-100, October 2014

What is the state of gender justice in Indonesia? How does it relate to communities and their natural resources management systems? What happens to gender justice when investors move in? What about climate change and the efforts to mitigate and adapt to it?  In this introductory article we set out some of the challenges to gender justice in Indonesia today.

DTE 99-100, October 2014

A view from Suskun Village, Papua.

By Yuliana Langowuyo, director of SKPKC Fransiskan Papua, who has been visiting the community in Susun Village at least once a month since 2011 to carry out research and provide assistance.

DTE 99-100, October 2014

An interview with Helena Trie, Communication Staff, Serikat Petani Kelapa Sawit (SPKS) the Oil Palm Smallholders Union.[1]

DTE 99-100, October 2014

By Mia Siscawati[1]

This article was prepared for the National Commission for Human Rights as part of its 2014 National Inquiry into the Rights of Indigenous Peoples to their Territories in the Forest Zone.[2] DTE’s translation was done with kind permission of the author, and with her assistance.

Guest article by GRAIN. This article was first published in January 2014 on GRAIN’s website,

DTE 98, March 2014

Sudarmin Paliba stands on a hillside, looking down through row upon row of oil palm trees. "This is where we had our fruit trees, and at the bottom we grew paddy rice," he says.