Newsletter articles

DTE's quarterly newsletter provides information on ecological justice in Indonesia.

To get on the mailing list for e-updates with links to the latest articles or PDF file of the full newsletter, click in the green box on the homepage.

The Bahasa Indonesia list offers links to selected articles from each newsletter issue.

To get on our  mailing list for hard copies (£10 a year, English newsletter only) send a request to

DTE publications

DTE, October 31st, 2014

This Indonesian language discussion was broadcast on October 30th to mark the launch of DTE's 100th edition newsletter, Fair enough? Women, men, communities and ecological justice in Indonesia.

The four women discussing gender justice with their KBR 68 hosts are: Siti Maimunah (SAINS), Betty Tio Minar (DTE), Ratri Kusumohartono (Sawit Watch) and Puspa Dewi (Solidaritas Perempuan).

The broadcast, which also invites callers to phone in, and responds to their questions, starts 3.09 minutes into the file.

DTE 89-90, November 2011

...and some hopes for securing sustainable livelihoods.

Notes from a workshop co-organised by LP3BH, Yalhimo, Mnukwar, DTE and PPP.

Down to Earth 87, December 2010

Down to Earth No.85-86, August 2010 

Voices from an East Kalimantan village tell what it's like to live in a major coal-mining area. By Siti Maimunah (Working Team on Women and Mining, JATAM) and Merah Johansyah (JATAM East Kalimantan).

Makroman, a village in Samarinda municipality - the capital of East Kalimantan province - is encircled by mines. For the past five years coal mining operations have been excavating the land around Makroman.

Down to Earth No.84, March 2010 

Don't buy or invest in Indonesian pulp and paper

An open letter from Indonesian CSOs sent in March calls on consumers of, and investors in, Indonesia's pulp and paper to halt existing investments and refrain from new investments and purchases from pulp and paper companies until there is evidence of real reform in the sector.

Down to Earth 83, December 2009

While crucial climate talks proceed at international level, how are the lives of local communities being affected by climate change? In November, Indonesia's Civil Society Forum for Climate Justice held two Climate Hearings in Jakarta to try and present some answers to this question. The following is adapted from DTE's translation of a new CSF report 'From Krui to Timor - how farmers and fishing communities are facing climate change'.

Down to Earth No.83, December 2009

The following is an abridged translation of an Indonesian-language article by M. Riza Damanik and Abdul Halim.1