Indonesia has great natural wealth but many of its citizens live in extreme poverty. Democratic progress has been made since the resigation of former president Suharto in 1998, but many civil society organisations feel that far too little progress has been made towards sustainable management of the country's resources, and ensuring that Indonesia's diverse communities have a real say in decisions which affect their future.

DTE, October 31st, 2014

This Indonesian language discussion was broadcast on October 30th to mark the launch of DTE's 100th edition newsletter, Fair enough? Women, men, communities and ecological justice in Indonesia.

The four women discussing gender justice with their KBR 68 hosts are: Siti Maimunah (SAINS), Betty Tio Minar (DTE), Ratri Kusumohartono (Sawit Watch) and Puspa Dewi (Solidaritas Perempuan).

The broadcast, which also invites callers to phone in, and responds to their questions, starts 3.09 minutes into the file.

DTE 99-100, October 2014

What is the state of gender justice in Indonesia? How does it relate to communities and their natural resources management systems? What happens to gender justice when investors move in? What about climate change and the efforts to mitigate and adapt to it?  In this introductory article we set out some of the challenges to gender justice in Indonesia today.

DTE 99-100, October 2014

This was the message to the candidates taking part in this year’s Presidential elections, issued by Solidaritas Perempuan (Women’s Solidarity for Human Rights) in its Earth Day press release, 22nd April 2014.

Translated by DTE.

DTE 99-100, October 2013

Too often indigenous women are prevented from making key decision for themselves, leaving them powerless to ensure gender-related injustices which directly affect them, their families and their communities are understood and addressed.

DTE 99-100, October 2014

The following article is based on a discussion with Solidaritas Perempuan (SP) in July 2014, with some additional information by DTE.

Joint briefing by WDM, LMN, WALHI, FoE Australia and DTE

October 2014

For centuries, the indigenous Dayak peoples of Indonesian Borneo lived from the abundant forests and rivers that blanketed the
region. Now, BHP Billiton is planning to build a series of massive coal mines that would destroy primary rainforest, deprive indigenous peoples of their customary land, and pollute water sources relied on by up to 1 million people.

Click on the link below for the full text.