Foreign investment

DTE 93-94, December 2012

A protracted land conflict in Aceh involving communities, a plantation company and a struggle for authority between central and regional authorities.

By Zulfikar Arma, Aceh’s Indigenous Peoples Network (JKMA).

DTE 93-94, December 2012

Snapshots of corporate control over land in Indonesia

Many of Indonesia's wealthiest business players control extensive landholdings for large-scale projects such as oil palm and pulpwood plantations, mining, oil and gas, logging, tourism and property. Some of the country's highest earning conglomerates, including the Bakrie Group and the Royal Golden Eagle Group have interests in several sectors which demand large areas of land.

Letter to UK press, 31st October 2012
Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono visits the UK this week. Indonesia has made strides towards democracy since the 1998 fall of Suharto and UK companies are increasing their investments in its burgeoning market. However human rights violations continue to abound in Papua where the right to freedom of expression is not upheld. Over 60 violations including stabbings and fatal shootings have taken place this year alone.

The following is extracted from 'Killing me softly with his song: inside another BHP Billiton AGM', October 25, 2012. Reflection by Richard Solly, Co-ordinator, London Mining Network.

Andrew Hickman of Down to Earth spoke of the destructiveness of the company’s coal project in Kalimantan, Indonesia. He was told that the company was still studying possibilities and would not go ahead with any major project during the coming year...

TAPOL and Down to Earth
Media advisory, October 24, 2012

Demonstrations planned for Wednesday, 31 October 2012

Press Release by London Mining Network and War on Want, 25th October 2012

Poor ‘hit by mines giant’ press £2,000-a-day peer

Plea to former UK international development minister

DTE briefing in advance of the visit of President SBY to UK, October-November 2012

For the full briefing pack with contributions from DTE and other civil society organisations, click here.

Policies aimed at promoting economic growth in Indonesia are leading to more and more of the country’s land and resources being taken over by large businesses. The process is further marginalizing Indonesia’s indigenous peoples and local communities.