Economy & debt

Down to Earth No.79, November 2008

Indonesian organisations have circulated the following information about the impact of the global credit crunch and falling palm oil prices on peasant farmers in the province Jambi, Sumatra. Translation from the Indonesian by DTE.

Since palm oil became 'the golden crop' around the year 2000, the European market for this commodity has grown year on year, not only to satisfy demand from the food and cosmetics industries, but also as an alternative energy source to fossil fuels.

Down to Earth No.78, August 2008

NGOs have called on British MPs to take action on climate justice and sustainable livelihoods, impunity, Aceh and West Papua.

In a meeting with British parliamentarians in London, June 3rd, a group of UK-based NGOs, including Down to Earth, called on the British government to take action on a range of issues related to human rights and development.

Down to Earth No.78, August 2008

A DTE workshop at this year's UK climate camp drew attention to climate change concerns in Indonesia.

Down to Earth No.78, August 2008

Ben Young of Jubilee Scotland writes about the on-going campaign to cancel Suharto's debt legacy to the UK.

Indonesia's total external debt is over US$130 billion. Much of this money should by rights be owed by the estate of the late General Suharto himself. Ranked by Transparency International as the most corrupt dictator of modern times, he is reckoned to have stolen up to $31 billion. But Suharto was not the sole culprit of this corruption.

Down to Earth No.78, August 2008

As the intergovernmental process to agree a post-Kyoto climate agreement moves towards the 2009 deadline, Asian civil society groups meeting in Bangkok in July have called again for climate justice. Global anti-poverty campaigners have also criticised the richest countries of failing to live up to promises of strong commitments on climate change at June's G8 meeting in Hokkaido.

Down to Earth No.78, August 2008

Papuans are calling on the Indonesian government to stop issuing licences for companies logging and developing plantations in Papua's forests until indigenous rights are protected.

Down to Earth No.76-77, May 2008

Indonesian agrofuel,1 producers are putting operations on hold as high demand drives up prices.

Since the Indonesian government issued its agrofuels policy in 2006, 22 companies have been set up to produce these alternative fuels.