Economy & debt

DTE 95, March 2013

Indonesia’s Catholic Church leaders have expressed concern about the over-exploitation of natural resources and the resulting social conflict and marginalisation of vulnerable communities. Short-termism in politics and the denial of environmental justice makes matters worse, they say, calling on politicians, business and the Christian community to take steps to protect resources, livelihoods and the right to life of current and future generations.

Down to Earth No.76-77, May 2008

This May marks the tenth anniversary of Suharto's fall from power. The former president, who headed a military regime which ruled Indonesia for 32 years, died in January this year aged 86.

Down to Earth No. 72 March 2007

CGI creditor group disbanded

Indonesia's creditor group, the Consultative Group on Indonesia, has been disbanded after President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono said it was no longer needed. The January announcement was officially welcomed the World Bank, former CGI chair and one of Indonesia's three main creditors alongside the Asian Development Bank and Japan.

Down to Earth No 62   August 2004

Community holds Newmont to account
Villagers from Buyat Bay, North Sulawesi have lodged complaints with the police over the devastating health impacts of Newmont Minahasa Raya's gold mine. At least 30 people are believed to have died as a result of the heavy metal pollution caused by the mine, which dumps tailings on the sea-bed.

Down to Earth No 58  August 2003

Indonesia is being pushed by powerful mining multinationals to open up protected forests for mining, but the international campaign to prevent yet more forest destruction is gaining momentum.

A final decision on whether or not companies can mine in Indonesia's protected forests - putting at risk some of the most biodiverse ecosystems in the world - is expected to be issued by Indonesia's parliament soon.

An Indonesian NGO coalition, led by mining advocacy network, JATAM, is campaigning to ma

Down to Earth No. 58, August 2003

The long record of human rights abuses associated with Indonesia's first pulp and rayon mill in North Sumatra has so far failed to convince the government to shut it down. The protests continue.

Fifty two village heads from three subdistricts in North Sumatra travelled to Jakarta in June to urge the government to shut down the notorious Toba Pulp Lestari (TPL) mill, formerly known as Indorayon.

Down to Earth No 52 February 2002

BP currently joint owns and manages Indonesia's biggest coal mine. It has 50% of the shares in PT Kaltim Prima Coal (KPC), a massive open cast mine near Sangatta, East Kutai district, East Kalimantan province. The Anglo-Australian mining giant, Rio Tinto, owns the other 50%. KPC is currently embroiled in a power struggle with the local authorities as, under the initial agreement, this foreign-owned company must sell off 51% of its shares to Indonesian parties [1].