Climate justice

Climate justice means equitable solutions to climate change which are based on the rights, needs, participation, and agreement of the communities who are feeling the greatest impact of climate change or who will be affected by mitigation attempts.

Climate justice and sustainable livelihoods are closely linked, since community management of resources that support livelihoods offers a better chance of long term sustainability than top-down development schemes which serve the interests of national and international business elites, and reinforce global inequality.

Indonesian civil society protest in Copenhagen, December 2009

Indonesian edition of AMAN-DTE book published online

Press release by AMAN and DTE

May 21st, 2013

Following last Thursday’s landmark ruling on customary forests by Indonesia's Constitutional Court, AMAN and DTE have announced the publication online of the Indonesian edition of their book Forests for the Future. The printed version will be available at a later date.

DTE's new Indonesian-language book, Keadilan Iklim dan Penghidupan yang Berkelanjutan Jilid II (Climate Justice and Sustainable Livelihoods 2nd Edition) is updated from the 2009 book.

It consists of DTE newsletter articles on the themes of climate justice, climate change developments in Indonesia, energy and renewable energy; and sustainable livelihoods. 

To view the PDF version, click here.

To request a hard copy, please contact dte@gn.apc.org.

Down to Earth No.83, December 2009

The following is an abridged translation of an Indonesian-language article by M. Riza Damanik and Abdul Halim.1

Down to Earth No.80-81, June 2009

In April the Indonesian people elected their paliamentary representatives. Partai Demokrat, the party of incumbent president Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono (SBY), secured the strongest position with around 20% of the seats. On 8th July are the elections for president and vice-president, with three pairs of candidates in the running: SBY and Boediono, Megawati and Prabowo, and Jusuf Kalla and Wiranto. What are the prospects for ecological justice?

Down to Earth No.80-81, June 2009

While this year's parliamentary and presidential elections have been dominating political life in Indonesia in recent months, the issue of climate change took a low priority on the competing parties' manifestos. Meanwhile, the government's much-criticised regulation on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) has been issued. Twenty projects are now underway in the country.

Down to Earth No.80-81, June 2009

The first World Oceans Conference in Manado, North Sulawesi, was the scene of a police clamp-down on civil society in May, when two leading members of WALHI (Friends of the Earth Indonesia) were arrested and sixteen other people were deported. Parallel CSO activities had been organised to highlight the need to recognise and protect the rights of small-scale fisherfolk in international marine negotiations.

Down to Earth No. 76-77 May 2008

Another year, another set of record profits from West Papua's mineral resources.

The Westminster conference centre just alongside the UK's Houses of Parliament and Westminster Abbey seem a long way away from the frontier town of Timika or, for that matter, the prawn fisherfolk of Bintuni Bay in West Papua. However, each year this is the scene of the Annual General Meeting of Rio Tinto PLC, a 40% joint venture stakeholder in the expanded Grasberg mine in the highlands of West Papua.