International

 

 

Down to Earth No. 42, August 1999

A new approach to lending is needed among Indonesia's creditors which addresses the problems of poverty, the abuse of human rights and the degradation of natural resources.

Down to Earth No. 42 1999

Construction of the US$1 billion PT Tanjung Enim Lestari (PT TEL) paper pulp plant in Muara Enim, South Sumatra, is nearly complete. Hundreds of contract workers will be laid off soon. Most of the equipment, from Scandinavian, Canadian and German companies backed by export credit agreements from their governments, has been installed. Production is expected to start in October. The plant's capacity is 450,000 tonnes of pulp per year.

Down to Earth No. 38, August 1998

As UK-based mining giant Rio Tinto tries to launch a 'charm offensive', NGOs in Indonesia, England and Australia continue to challenge the company on its human rights and environment records.

Rio Tinto held its London Annual General Meeting on May 13th.

Down to Earth No. 38, August 1998

In post-Suharto Indonesia, the reform movement is pushing for a new, clean government and demanding that the nation's rich resources are returned to the control of the people. Down to Earth salutes the reform movement and supports the forces for democracy and ecological justice in their struggle for a better future!

Down to Earth No. 36 February 1998

The highland region of West Papua is in the grip of the worst famine in living memory. Thousands are dying of starvation and disease. The effects of the prolonged drought have been exacerbated by apparent government indifference, lack of transportation for relief supplies and inappropriate "solutions" to the crisis.

Down to Earth No. 36 February 1998

The rapid expansion of oil palm plantations is enriching the entrepreneurs but impoverishing farmers whose lands are taken over for development.

Down to Earth No. 35, November 1997, Forest Fires Special Supplement

1997 will be remembered as a year when greed and folly led to international pollution on an unprecedented scale. Indonesia's fires, burning in some places since June, have devastated vast swathes of forests and farmland and have endangered the health of tens of millions of people across at least six countries.