Indigenous Peoples

Down to Earth No.83, December 2009

By Chris Lang.1


Indonesia's President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono likes to make promises. Particularly at international meetings.

Down to Earth No.83, December 2009

Despite urgent calls for action from civil society, climate scientists and governments of some of the most vulnerable countries, the pace of progress towards a new international climate deal has been frustratingly slow.

Down to Earth No.83, December 2009

Hydro-dam for Papua

Papua's provincial administration has announced plans to develop a hydro power project with a maximum capacity of 2000MW to provide electricity and support infrastructure development.

Down to Earth No.82, September 2009

More deaths at Freeport-Rio Tinto mine in Papua

More violence near the Freeport-Rio Tinto copper and gold mine in West Papua resulted in three deaths - two Freeport employees and a police officer - in July. Police arrested seven people: two of them worked at the company's Grasberg mine. More shots were fired at a bus carrying the mine's employees in August, with one incident leaving five people injured.

Down to Earth No.82, September 2009

As Indonesia pushes ahead with plans for REDD, the World Bank and others are making ill-prepared agreements on funding projects in Indonesia.

Down to Earth No.82, September 2009

AMAN, Indonesia’s Indigenous Peoples’ Alliance, has issued a statement on climate change. The Sinar Resmi Declaration was agreed at a national meeting of the organisation, hosted by the Banten Kidul indigenous community in West Java.

Down to Earth No.82, September 2009

European countries are turning to agrofuels for energy and transport as part of their strategy to move away from fossil fuels and meet greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets. The use of palm oil as an agrofuel source has drawn strong criticism due to the severe social, environmental and negative climate change impacts, which contradict industry claims that it is a 'green' fuel.