Climate Justice and sustainable livelihoods

DTE is campaigning for climate justice. We want equitable solutions to climate change which are based on the rights, needs, participation, and agreement of the communities who are feeling the greatest impact of climate change or who will be affected by mitigation attempts.

We believe that community management of natural resources that support livelihoods offers a better chance of long term sustainability than top-down development schemes which serve the interests of business elites and reinforce global inequality.

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Down to Earth No.80-81, June 2009

Indonesia's forestry department has extended a 2009 deadline for pulp companies to source their wood supply from tree plantations only. Now companies can continue pulping natural forests until 2014.

Down to Earth No.80-81, June 2009

In January 2009 DTE marked its 20th birthday by inviting friends to a gathering in Bogor. On the same occasion we launched an Indonesian language compilation of climate change articles taken from recent DTE newsletters. The following review of our activities was published as the introduction to that book.

Down to Earth No.80-81, June 2009

The first World Oceans Conference in Manado, North Sulawesi, was the scene of a police clamp-down on civil society in May, when two leading members of WALHI (Friends of the Earth Indonesia) were arrested and sixteen other people were deported. Parallel CSO activities had been organised to highlight the need to recognise and protect the rights of small-scale fisherfolk in international marine negotiations.

Down to Earth No.80-81, June 2009

The following letter was addressed to Ed Miliband, Britain's Secretary of State for the Department of Energy and Climate Change. The letter raises questions about a UK-Indonesia Memorandum of Understanding on climate change signed in December 2008.1

Down to Earth No.80-81, June 2009

This is a key year for decision-making about climate change as governments work towards a global agreement in Copenhagen in December. Will COP15 bring social justice, environmental sustainability and protection for human rights into the negotiations, as many civil society groups around the world are calling for?

Down to Earth No.79, November 2008


The third global congress of Women in Politics and Governance took place in Manila in the Philippines from 19 - 22nd October 2008. Its theme was 'Gender in Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Reduction'. DTE was able to take part, thanks to a grant from CAFOD. This article summarises the key issues.


Climate change is part of a chain reaction of damage to natural resources and the environment.

Down to Earth No.79, November 2008


International pressure to get pilot schemes for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries (REDD) up and running between now and the Copenhagen climate summit in 2009 could mean that crucial issues - including land and resource rights in forests - are sidestepped.


Why the pressure for REDD? Land use change and forestry are estimated to account for around 20% of annual carbon emissions, second only to the energy sector.