Climate Justice and sustainable livelihoods

DTE is campaigning for climate justice. We want equitable solutions to climate change which are based on the rights, needs, participation, and agreement of the communities who are feeling the greatest impact of climate change or who will be affected by mitigation attempts.

We believe that community management of natural resources that support livelihoods offers a better chance of long term sustainability than top-down development schemes which serve the interests of business elites and reinforce global inequality.

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Press Release, Civil Society forum (CSF) for Climate Justice

Jakarta- Indonesia, March 23st, 2011.

Indonesia’s parliament has noted that during 2008 to 2010 the Government’s climate change debt to Japan, France and the World Bank for climate change-related loans amounted to USD 1.907 billion. Yet the public do not know what these funds are being used for. Meanwhile, fisherfolk, farmers and fi

Down to Earth 87, December 2010

An Indonesian activist perspective on renewable energy, following a visit to a community wind project in Belgium.
 
By Siti Maimunah & Kahar Al Bahri - JATAM

Down to Earth 87, December 2010

This article is based on a presentation by YMTM (Yayasan Mitra Tani Mandiri) held at a meeting of Caritas Australia partners, in October 2010. DTE also interviewed YMTM representatives Joseph Asa and Hilaria Kou.

DTE Special Briefing March 2010

A selection of international instruments applicable to Indonesia which relate to sustainable development, climate change and human rights.

DTE 84, March 2010

By Pang Yuriun, Coordinator of Aceh's Indigenous Peoples' Network (JKMA).

Accepting REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation) schemes as a necessary means to combat global warming bears a series of consequences for all of us. First, measures undertaken under the REDD mechanism need to be an integral part of an overall strategy to combat illegal logging and reduce the rate of forest destruction and degradation.

Down to Earth No.84, March 2010

Indonesia's forestry minister has announced that millions of hectares of 'new forests' will be planted.

Down to Earth No.84, March 2010 

Don't buy or invest in Indonesian pulp and paper

An open letter from Indonesian CSOs sent in March calls on consumers of, and investors in, Indonesia's pulp and paper to halt existing investments and refrain from new investments and purchases from pulp and paper companies until there is evidence of real reform in the sector.