Indonesia has great natural wealth but many of its citizens live in extreme poverty. Democratic progress has been made since the resigation of former president Suharto in 1998, but many civil society organisations feel that far too little progress has been made towards sustainable management of the country's resources, and ensuring that Indonesia's diverse communities have a real say in decisions which affect their future.

DTE, October 31st, 2014

This Indonesian language discussion was broadcast on October 30th to mark the launch of DTE's 100th edition newsletter, Fair enough? Women, men, communities and ecological justice in Indonesia.

The four women discussing gender justice with their KBR 68 hosts are: Siti Maimunah (SAINS), Betty Tio Minar (DTE), Ratri Kusumohartono (Sawit Watch) and Puspa Dewi (Solidaritas Perempuan).

The broadcast, which also invites callers to phone in, and responds to their questions, starts 3.09 minutes into the file.

DTE 99-100, October 2014

This was the message to the candidates taking part in this year’s Presidential elections, issued by Solidaritas Perempuan (Women’s Solidarity for Human Rights) in its Earth Day press release, 22nd April 2014.

Translated by DTE.

DTE 99-100, October 2013

Too often indigenous women are prevented from making key decision for themselves, leaving them powerless to ensure gender-related injustices which directly affect them, their families and their communities are understood and addressed.

DTE 99-100, October 2014

The following article is based on a discussion with Solidaritas Perempuan (SP) in July 2014, with some additional information by DTE.

How green are the elections? Do Indonesia’s voters care about ecological justice? We take a very brief look...

DTE 98, March 2014

The environment is a marginal issue not worthy of any attention. This is the perception evident from the election campaigns of parliamentary candidates, almost all of which are failing to focus on the environment.

Press Release by AMAN and DTE, Jakarta and London, 17th March, 2014

Civil society organisations in Indonesia and the UK have joined forces to urge their government leaders to protect the rights of indigenous peoples in Indonesia. It is critical that unfinished business on recognising and protecting the rights of an estimated 60-120 million Indonesians are implemented as the country’s President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono enters the last few months of his second and final term.

President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono
Merdeka Palace

The Rt Hon David Cameron, MP
Prime Minister
10 Downing Street

March 17th, 2014

Re:  urgent action on indigenous peoples rights in Indonesia – your role as co-chairs of the High Level Panel of Eminent Persons on the Post 2015 Development Agenda