Mining, oil & gas

Down to Earth No. 44, February 2000

It is no coincidence that JATAM's November meeting was held at the northern tip of Sulawesi.

Down to Earth No. 44, February 2000

Indonesian communities and NGOs have called for a moratorium on large-scale mining in Indonesia

The Mining Advocacy Network (JATAM) - an association of community organisations and NGOs - issued a call for an immediate stop to all mining activities in Indonesia at a November workshop in Tomohon, North Sulawesi.

Down to Earth No 43, November 1999

After many years of peaceful process and unsuccessful negotiations, Dayaks communities in Central Kalimantan have moved back on to their traditional mining sites. This direct action was taken as a last resort to defend rights consistently denied by the Indonesian government and by the mining company which took over their lands.

Down to Earth No 43, November 1999


The push for an independent West Papua is gaining strength: mass protests met the government's decision to split the territory into three provinces and the vote in East Timor fuelled demands for independence.

Down to Earth No. 43, November 1999

Rio Tinto, the UK-based mining giant is exploring the possibility of opening a nickel mine in Kendari district, Southeast Sulawesi. Joordan Hutagalung, an executive of PT Rio Tinto Exploration Indonesia said in July that the company had been issued a licence for survey preparations. Satellite imagery showed that the area contained nickel, copper and gold.

Down to Earth No. 43, November 1999

In South Kalimantan province, coal mining - involving Australian companies - is continuing to disrupt the lives of local communities. In Hulu Sungai Utara district, the district head, Suhailin Muchtar said that both legal and illegal coal mining activities had damaged the environment. PT Adaro Indonesia's coal mine (part-owned by Australia's New Hope) operates in this district.

Down to Earth Special Issue, October 1999

Through the Congress and subsequent events, indigenous peoples have presented their demands to government officials, political parties and the National Human Rights Commission. They have done this directly and through demonstrations, press statements and delegations. Such action was impossible in the Suharto years when open discussion of land rights was branded communist or subversive.