Climate justice

Climate justice means equitable solutions to climate change which are based on the rights, needs, participation, and agreement of the communities who are feeling the greatest impact of climate change or who will be affected by mitigation attempts.

Climate justice and sustainable livelihoods are closely linked, since community management of resources that support livelihoods offers a better chance of long term sustainability than top-down development schemes which serve the interests of national and international business elites, and reinforce global inequality.

Indonesian civil society protest in Copenhagen, December 2009

Down to Earth No.82, September 2009

Coastal communities have been marginalised by big business, as well as policies and legislation that favours large companies. They now face additional threats from the impacts of climate change.

Down to Earth No.82, September 2009

Indonesia's policy and practice in relation to sustainable development, climate change and human rights is to a significant extent governed by its obligations under international treaties and other international instruments.

Down to Earth No.82, September 2009

More deaths at Freeport-Rio Tinto mine in Papua

More violence near the Freeport-Rio Tinto copper and gold mine in West Papua resulted in three deaths - two Freeport employees and a police officer - in July. Police arrested seven people: two of them worked at the company's Grasberg mine. More shots were fired at a bus carrying the mine's employees in August, with one incident leaving five people injured.

Down to Earth No.82, September 2009

As Indonesia pushes ahead with plans for REDD, the World Bank and others are making ill-prepared agreements on funding projects in Indonesia.

Down to Earth No.82, September 2009

A DTE interview with Giorgio Budi Indrarto, Coordinator of Indonesia's Civil Society Forum for Climate Justice.

Down to Earth No.82, September 2009

AMAN, Indonesia’s Indigenous Peoples’ Alliance, has issued a statement on climate change. The Sinar Resmi Declaration was agreed at a national meeting of the organisation, hosted by the Banten Kidul indigenous community in West Java.

Down to Earth No.80-81, June 2009

The following letter was addressed to Ed Miliband, Britain's Secretary of State for the Department of Energy and Climate Change. The letter raises questions about a UK-Indonesia Memorandum of Understanding on climate change signed in December 2008.1